This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
36B Te Aute Road, Havelock North
Hastings, 4130, New Zealand
+64 6 877 5447

New Zealand Relocation and Resettlement Specialists

 
New Zealand Immigration with On Arrival Resettlement Services

Useful Information to Immigrate to New Zealand

If you are considering moving to New Zealand, here is some information about living in New Zealand that you may find useful before you relocate.

Immigrate to New Zealand - Fiordland NZThis has been compiled on the basis of some Frequently Asked Questions, from our many resettled clients over the years.

However, if you need any additional information about how to Immigrate to New Zealand, please don’t hesitate to ask us.

We have structured our Useful information in two distinct categories:

About New Zealand

Relocating to New Zealand

About New Zealand

  • Early History of New Zealand Open or Close

    Early New Zealand history has it that New Zealand was first discovered by Polynesian navigator Kupe around 800AD. His wife named the country Aotearoa - the land of the long white cloud. Centuries later a great migration of Polynesian Maoris from Kupe's homeland sailed to New Zealand and settled about 1350AD. Over the years since, these settlers developed their own distinct culture called 'Maori'.

    The first European thought to have landed on New Zealand shores was a Dutch explorer called Abel Tasman in 1642. It was a hostile encounter between his crew and local Maori. The Europeans didn't come back until 1769 when British explorer James Cook mapped the entire New Zealand coastline. During the early 19th century, conflict between Maori and the British was quite frequent.

    In 1840, the Treaty of Waitangi was signed making New Zealand a colony. This resulted in many more immigrants making New Zealand their home but also contributed to more conflict resulting in the New Zealand Wars. These wars lasted from 1845 to 1872 and were primarily around land ownership and the settlers who occupied the disputed land. Today historical disputes continue however are fought in the courtroom and by negotiation.

     

  • Overview Open or Close

    New Zealand (or Aotearoa – land of the long white cloud), truly is one of the most picturesque and photogenic places on earth. A small island nation of just over 4 million people, New Zealand is made up of two major land masses (North Island and South Island) and a number of smaller islands including Stewart Island located in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. The two main islands are divided by a 22km stretch of water called the Cook Strait.

    New Zealand is located approximately 1,500km east of Australia and about 1,000km from the Pacific Islands. Due to its relative remoteness and being water locked, New Zealand was one of the last countries to be found and settled.

    The country is made up of some of the world’s most spectacular landscapes, from vast mountain ranges, steaming volcanoes to sweeping coastlines. It is a natural playground for thrill seekers and adventurers and those who simply want to visit for the culture and landscapes.

     

  • New Zealand People Open or Close

    New Zealand’s society reflects many years of migration from all parts of the globe. The majority are of British descent, along with other European cultures such as Greek, Italian, French, Dutch, Dalmatian, Scandinavian and German.

    More recently people from islands throughout the Pacific, such as Samoa and Fiji, have migrated here, along with immigrants from China, Taiwan and Hong Kong.

    The largest non-European group of people are the Maori, the first settlers of New Zealand, known as the 'tangata whenua' (the people of the land) who make up around 15 percent of the population. Maori culture, art and traditions are an important part of New Zealand’s heritage and culture.

    English and Maori are both official languages, though the vast majority of people speak only English.

    One of the last places in the world to be discovered and settled, New Zealand today is a modern high-tech western nation with a well-developed economy and a government structure based on the British parliamentary system. A great place to live and work

  • Population of New Zealand Open or Close

    While the land masses of the North Island and South Island are similar, approximately two thirds of the population lives in the North Island and the remainder in the South Island. The majority of New Zealand's population is of European decent while Auckland, the largest city in New Zealand, is the most ethnically diverse in the country and has the largest Polynesian population of any city in the world. Auckland has about one third of the population (over 1.3 million), followed by the capital city of Wellington and the South Island city of Christchurch (each has approx 400,000). In 15th place is Gisborne, with a population of around 35,000.

    New Zealander's are affectionately known as "Kiwi's". The name derives from the kiwi, a flightless bird native to New Zealand. It is also the national symbol. Kiwi's are characterised as rugged, industrious problem solvers and people who innovate. Kiwi's are great travellers themselves with many exploring and making an impact on the world (sport, business, politics, etc). Younger New Zealander's often travel to England for working holidays before settling back in New Zealand and any New Zealander can travel and work in Australia indefinitely.

    English is the predominant language in New Zealand. After WWII, Maori were discouraged from speaking their own language in schools and workplaces so it really only existed as a community language. Nowadays it has undergone a revitalisation and is declared one of New Zealand's official languages with immersion in schools and tertiary sectors. Many places throughout the country have dual English and Maori names.

     

  • Geography Open or Close

    New Zealand is situated in the South Pacific ocean, between latitude 34'S and 47'S. The country runs roughly north-south with mountain ranges down much of its length. Its two main islands (North and South) cover 266,200 sq km (103,735 sq miles), about the size of Japan or California and slightly larger than Great Britain.

    New Zealand's separation from other land masses about 100 million years ago allowed many ancient plants and animals to live and evolve in isolation. Complementing our unique flora and fauna is a landscape that contains an unrivalled variety of landforms. In a couple of days drive it is possible to see everything from mountain ranges to sandy beaches, lush rainforests, glaciers and fiords and active volcanoes.

     

  • New Zealand Climate and Weather Open or Close

    New Zealand's climate is complex and varies from warm subtropical in the far north to cool temperate climates in the far south, with severe alpine conditions in the mountainous areas.

    Mountain chains extending the length of New Zealand provide a barrier for the prevailing westerly winds, dividing the country into dramatically different climate regions. The West Coast of the South Island is the wettest area of New Zealand, whereas the area to the east of the mountains, just over 100 km away, is the driest.

    Most areas of New Zealand have between 600 and 1600 mm of rainfall, spread throughout the year with a dry period during the summer. Over the northern and central areas of New Zealand more rainfall falls in winter than in summer, whereas for much of the southern part of New Zealand, winter is the season of least rainfall.

    Mean annual temperatures range from 10°C in the south to 16°C in the north of New Zealand. The coldest month is usually July and the warmest month is usually January or February. In New Zealand generally there are relatively small variations between summer and winter temperatures, although inland and to the east of the ranges the variation is greater (up to 14°C). Temperatures also drop about 0.7°C for every 100 m of altitude.

    Sunshine hours are relatively high in areas that are sheltered from the west and most of New Zealand would have at least 2000 hours annually. The midday summer solar radiation index (UVI) is often very high in most places and can be extreme in northern New Zealand and in mountainous areas. Autumn and spring UVI values can be high in most areas.

    Most snow in New Zealand falls in the mountain areas. Snow rarely falls in the coastal areas of the North Island and west of the South Island, although the east and south of the South Island may experience some snow in winter. Frosts can occur anywhere in New Zealand and usually form on cold nights with clear skies and little wind.

    Visitors are advised to come prepared for all types of weather, as the temperature can change quite rapidly during the day.

     

  • Maps and Travel Distances Open or Close

    Useful Facts

    Vehicles in NZ drive on the left hand side of the road

    It is compulsory to wear seat belts in NZ

    Speed limits are in kilometres per hour (kph), not miles per hour (mph)

    The average speed in cities/towns is 50kph; on the open roads 100kph

    Petrol (gas) is about $2.15 per litre

    Travel Distances for the North Island (in kilometres (kms)

     

    Auckland

    Gisborne

    Hamilton

    Rotorua

    Taupo

    Tauranga

    Wellington

    Whangerei

    Auckland

    -

    509

    126

    235

    279

    210

    647

    171

    Gisborne

    509

    -

    400

    291

    334

    299

    534

    680

    Hamilton

    126

    400

    -

    109

    153

    108

    521

    297

    Rotorua

    235

    291

    109

    -

    82

    83

    460

    406

    Taupo

    279

    334

    153

    82

    -

    165

    378

    450

    Tauranga

    210

    229

    108

    83

    165

    -

    543

    381

    Wellington

    647

    534

    521

    460

    378

    543

    -

    818

    Whangerei

    171

    680

    297

    406

    450

    381

    818

    -

     

    Travel Distances for the South Island (in kilometres (kms)

     

    Chch

    Dunedin

    Milford

    Mt.Cook

    Nelson

    Q/town

    TeAnau

    Wanaka

    Westport

    Christchurch

    -

    361

    771

    330

    417

    487

    650

    428

    336

    Dunedin

    361

    -

    410

    319

    799

    281

    289

    276

    670

    Milford

    771

    410

    -

    578

    1145

    307

    121

    366

    954

    Mt. Cook

    330

    319

    578

    -

    747

    271

    426

    212

    629

    Nelson

    417

    799

    1145

    747

    -

    850

    1024

    779

    230

    Queenstown

    487

    281

    307

    271

    850

    -

    166

    71

    659

    Te Anau

    650

    289

    121

    426

    1024

    166

    -

    245

    823

    Wanaka

    428

    276

    366

    212

    779

    71

    245

    -

    588

    Westport

    336

    670

    954

    629

    230

    659

    823

    588

    -

  • General Information Open or Close

    In this section we provide useful information such as electricity, phones and international drivers licence requirements.

    Electricity

    Electricity is supplied throughout New Zealand at 230/240 volts, 50 hertz. Most hotels and motels provide 110 volt ac sockets (rated at 20 watts) for electric razors only.

    For all other equipment an adapter/converter is necessary, unless the item has a multi-voltage option. Please note that power outlets only accept flat 3 or 2-pin plugs, depending on whether an earth connection is fitted

    Public Call-Phones

    Most public call-phones take cards purchased from bookstalls and newsagents, with a minimum value of NZ$2. Some public call-phones also accept credit cards, but very few accept coins.

    You can find New Zealand phone numbers online in the White Pages (alphabetical listings) and Yellow Pages (business category listings).

    Mobile Phones

    Check with your phone company before leaving home about international mobile roaming facilities available in New Zealand.

    New Zealand has two mobile networks, Vodafone's GSM network which will work with Vodafone phones from overseas, and Telecom New Zealand's CDMA network which requires a New Zealand specific phone.

    Laptops

    You will need an RJ45 type plug to be able to connect your laptop into a computer socket in New Zealand, and an adaptor with a flat two or three-point power plug to connect to the power supply.

    International Driving Licences and Permits

    You can legally drive in New Zealand for up to 12 months if you have either a current driver's licence from your home country or an International Driving Permit (IDP).

    Recent law changes mean all drivers, including visitors from other countries, must carry their licence or permit at all times when driving. You will only be able to drive the same types of vehicles you are licensed to drive in your home country. The common legal age to rent a car in New Zealand is 25 years.

    Make sure your driver's licence is current. If your licence is not in English, you should bring an English translation with you, or obtain an IDP. Contact your local automobile club for further details about obtaining a translation or an IDP.

     

  • Currency and Costs of Living Open or Close

    New Zealand's unit of currency is the New Zealand dollar (NZ$). Coins have values of 5, 10, 20 and 50 cents, $1 and $2; notes have values of $5, $10, $20, $50 and $100.

    There is no restriction on the amount of foreign currency that can be brought in or taken out of New Zealand. However, every person who carries more than NZ$10,000 in cash in or out of New Zealand is required to complete a Border Cash Report.

    Foreign currency can easily be exchanged at banks, some hotels and Bureau de Change kiosks, which are found at international airports and most city centres.

    All major credit cards can be used in New Zealand. Travellers Cheques are accepted at hotels, banks and some stores.

    New Zealand Bank Notes

    New Zealand Five Dollars

    New Zealand Ten Dollars

    http://onarrival.co.nz/_images/fivedollars.jpg* http://onarrival.co.nz/_images/tendollars.jpg*
    http://onarrival.co.nz/_images/fivedollarsback.jpg* http://onarrival.co.nz/_images/tendollarsback.jpg*

    New Zealand Twenty Dollars

    New Zealand Fifty Dollars

    http://onarrival.co.nz/_images/twentydollars.jpg* http://onarrival.co.nz/_images/fiftydollars.jpg*
    http://onarrival.co.nz/_images/twentydollarsback.jpg* http://onarrival.co.nz/_images/fiftydollarsback.jpg*

    New Zealand One Hundred Dollars

     
    http://onarrival.co.nz/_images/hundreddollars.jpg*    

     

    The cost of living in New Zealand is comparable to all OECD countries.

    Consumer goods are of a similar style and standard to those found overseas and are competitively-priced. Imported items such as cars, electrical and computer equipment and petrol cost are on a par with what you'd find in Australia or other similar countries.

    Mercer’s 2012 Cost of Living Survey ranks cities worldwide – 1st place being the most expensive place to live. The survey lists Auckland (56) and Wellington (74) far better than many other major cities. Such cities included Sydney (11), London (25) and New York (33) – showing that comparatively, New Zealand’s major metropolitan areas are more affordable than those in other countries.

    In New Zealand a Goods and Service Tax (GST) of 15% applies to everything except income and financial transactions.

    Cost of consumer items

    Washing machine
    NZ$600–1100

    Movie ticket
    NZ$12-20

    Round of golf
    NZ$20–100

    Ford Focus (2.0L, 5 door)
    NZ$35,490

    Cup of coffee (flat white)
    NZ$4.00

    91 octane petrol (per litre)
    NZ$2.00 - $2.25

    42” LED-LCD flat screen TV
    NZ$700–1500

    Milk (2 litres)
    NZ$3.99

    Pair of jeans
    NZ$60–200

    Big Mac
    NZ$5.00

     

     

  • Schools and Education in New Zealand Open or Close

    The following is an excerpt from a Ministry of Education publication called Schooling in New Zealand - A Guide. A full copy of this guide can be found at the Ministry's website www.minedu.govt.nz.

    Schools in New Zealand - A Guide from the Ministry of Education

    With few exceptions, all children in New Zealand must attend school from their sixth until their sixteenth birthday.

    Compulsory education in New Zealand is divided into primary, intermediate and secondary schooling.

    Primary schools are the first level. They cater for children from the age of five years - Year 0 - to the end of Year 6.

    Children in Years 7 and 8 may either be in a separate intermediate school or part of a primary, secondary or composite/area school.

    Secondary schools usually provide for students from Year 9 until the end of Year 13. Adult students who return to school enter in whichever year the majority of their subjects are in.

    Area/composite schools, which are usually based in rural areas, combine primary, intermediate and secondary schooling at one location.

    International Students

    International students must have a student permit to study in a New Zealand school for three months or longer. On Arrival has assisted settling many children into the NZ education system. Please contact us for details.

    Types of schools

    While most students in New Zealand attend state-funded schools, parents or caregivers and students have the choice of a number of schooling options.

    • State schools are co-educational (mixed sexes) at primary and intermediate level but some offer single-sex education at secondary level. Lessons are based on the New Zealand Curriculum. Some state schools offer special programmes for adult students or run community education classes.

    • Special schools are state schools that provide education for students with special education needs. The curriculum is the same as at other state schools.

    • Integrated schools are schools that used to be private and have now become part of the state system. They teach the New Zealand Curriculum but keep their own special character (usually a philosophical or religious belief) as part of their school programme. Integrated schools receive the same government funding for each student as state schools but their buildings and land are privately owned so they charge attendance dues to meet their property costs.

    • Designated Character schools are state schools that teach the New Zealand Curriculum but have been allowed to develop their own set of aims, purposes and objectives to reflect their own particular values.

    • Independent (or private) schools are governed by their own independent boards but must meet certain standards in order to be registered. Independent schools may be either co-educational or single-sex. They charge fees, but also receive some subsidy funding from the government.

    • Boarding schools may either be independent or part of a state-funded school. All charge boarding fees.

    • The Correspondence School (TCS) provides distance learning for more than 18,000 students across New Zealand. Students may live a long way from their nearest school, live overseas, study with TCS for medical reasons or have special needs. Secondary students may also enrol in specific subjects if these are not available at their regular school.

    Additional Useful Links

    The Education New Zealand website http://www.educationnz.org.nz

    The Education Review Office website http://www.ero.govt.nz

     

Immigrate to New Zealand

  • Immigration Rules Open or Close

    The immigration process is complex. Inappropriate advice or incorrect documentation may cause an application to be declined while lack of knowledge may open the migrant to exploitation. It is therefore of paramount importance that you receive guaranteed, reliable and trustworthy advice throughout the process, from your initial enquiry until your successful resettlement in your new land.

    You will also find that immigration policy changes rapidly and frequently as our Government responds to the changing needs of New Zealand. It is therefore critical that you receive current advice direct from within New Zealand, with the latest information.
    Using every possible opportunity to ensure you are well informed about the New Zealand immigration requirements is imperative.

    The New Zealand Immigration Service has a set of guidelines for determining if you would qualify for residence. These can be reviewed in detail by visiting their website at http://www.immigration.govt.nz/Migrant.

    On Arrival also has an Alliance with a Licensed Immigration Consultancy that can assist you, please see “Our Partners” page.

     

  • Visa Requirements Open or Close

    If you have made the decision to come to New Zealand to live, work, invest, study, or visit, you will need to apply and be approved for a Visa. 

    There are many types of visas issued for temporary purposes, for which an application may be made. To determine whether you are eligible to come to New Zealand for a particular purpose for a defined time period, please review the brief descriptions below.

    There are several different categories of Visa applications, and the following will give you an overview of each category.

    Skilled Migrant

    In November 2003, the Minister of Immigration announced the immediate closure of the Interim General Skills category for immigration to NZ. A new Skilled Migrant Category (SMC) was established in December 2003 which requires that intending applicants lodge an Expression of Interest (EOI). EOIs are placed in a pool and draws are made from the pool on a regular basis – currently two-weekly.

    If you’ve got the required skills, the Skilled Migrant Category offers you the opportunity to move to New Zealand to work and live permanently. However, you will have to have the following basic requirements:

    • Recognised basic qualification (e.g. trade qualification, diploma, bachelors' degree,

    • At least two years work experience unless you hold a New Zealand 'Base' qualification,

    • A high level of competence in English,

    • Ability to provide financial support and accommodation for yourself and your family for your first two years in New Zealand, and

    • You have a relevant offer of employment from a New Zealand employer or are already employed in New Zealand.

    Temporary work

    If you’ve an offer of a job from a New Zealand employer, you’re skilled in an occupation that’s in demand here, or you’re coming here for a particular purpose or event, you can apply for a temporary Work Visa.

    Work to residence

    You may have an exceptional talent in sports or the arts, or you’re qualified in a highly specialised or in-demand field.

    If this is the case, you can apply for a work permit under our Work to Residence category. This category allows you to work temporarily in New Zealand as a step towards gaining permanent residence.

    Employee of a relocating company

    New Zealand offers many business investment opportunities and welcomes businesses that want to move here.

    If you’re a key employee of a business that’s relocating its operations to New Zealand, you can apply for a work permit and later a resident permit under our Employee of a Relocating Company category.

    Working holiday

    Want to get a real taste of life in New Zealand?

    We have agreements with many countries to offer young people aged between 18 and 30 years the opportunity to travel around New Zealand taking up temporary work while they’re here.

    Only people from countries with whom we’ve made agreements can come to New Zealand on a working holiday. And in most cases you’ll need to apply for your Work Visa or Permit before you get here.

    Business Investor

    In this category, points are allocated for business experience, investment funds, and age.

    The following are the minimum criteria which all Investor category applicants must meet:

    • The maximum age acceptable in this category is 84 years.

    • This category requires investment funds of at least NZD 1,000,000 (approx. USD 500,000). Investment funds are to be treated separately from personal funds and must be invested in New Zealand for at least two years in an investment capable of providing a commercial return. Investment funds may not be used for the purchase of personal assets e.g. house, car, boat.

    • The actual level of funds required varies depending on points allocated for other criteria

    • Principal and non-principal applicants may pre-purchase English language tuition if they cannot achieve the standard of IELTS, band 5.

    • You have a relevant offer of employment from a New Zealand employer or are already employed in New Zealand. 

    Entrepreneur

    This category is for applicants who have successfully established a business in New Zealand that can be shown to be of benefit to New Zealand.

    Criteria must be met regarding shareholding and personal employment. Those who have been involved in bankruptcy, fraud or financial impropriety or in a business failure in the last five years may not apply.

    Long-term Business Visa/Permit (LTBV)

    This temporary entry category provides for people interested in applying for residence under the Entrepreneur Category or those wishing to establish a business in New Zealand but not intending to live permanently in New Zealand.

    Successful applicants under this category and their spouses/partners will be granted a multiple-entry 3-year Work Visa or Permit. This may be extended to a maximum of six years. Successful LTBV holders may apply for residence under the Entrepreneur category after two years.

    Employees of a Business Relocating to New Zealand (EBR - Residence)

    The EBR category facilitates the granting of residence to key employees of businesses relocating to New Zealand, who can show that they who do not qualify for residence under any other category.

    A key employee is one whom the Chief Executive Officer of that business considers essential to the operation of the business in New Zealand. EBR applications are considered by the Minister of Immigration on a case by case basis.

    Studying in New Zealand

    We’re pleased you’re thinking of New Zealand, and welcome people who’d like to study here.

    International students studying in New Zealand build our connections with the rest of the world and increase our understanding of other countries and cultures.

    Family Assessment

    You must have immediate family (parent, brother/sister or child) legally in New Zealand for 184 days in each of the 3 years immediately prior to the date of your application.

    Other requirements depend on your relationship to the New Zealand party. Your sponsor must be able to provide full financial and accommodation support for you (and your family), for your first two years in New Zealand. Welfare payments are generally not payable to new immigrants.

     

  • Moving Pets to New Zealand Open or Close

    If you have pets, be sure the airline you select is currently accepting animals as cargo Some airlines have been known to stop accepting them for certain periods of time. 

    Don't worry even though they're considered "cargo," animals are placed in a pressurised climate- controlled section of the hold (usually in the tail) and get special treatment from handlers.

    All animals must come through Auckland International Airport and most are subject to quarantine depending on the country they are from. They must have typically spent at least 6 months freely resident in their departure country, will require full vaccinations and a subcutaneous identity chip. Pets from most countries (with the notable exceptions of Australia and the UK) will also require a rabies lab test at least three weeks after vaccination.

    The rabies lab test results, which identifies the animal by it's identity chip number must be at least 6 months old before the animal will be eligible for importation. This is one of those long lead-time items that needs to be handled early or you may be forced to have your pet join you in NZ several months later.

    Only domesticated dogs and cats may be imported. If you have a non-traditional pet such as a bird, rabbit, ferret, hamster, guinea pig, rat, or mouse, it will unfortunately not be able to accompany you.

    Certain breeds (including cross-breeds) of dog are also not eligible for
    importation. These include the American Pit Bull Terrier, Dogo Argentine, Japanese Tosa and Brazilian Fila.

    Required vaccinations for dogs:

    • Hepatitis

    • Canine Cough (adenovirus 2, parainfluenza & bordetella)

    • Leptospirosis

    • Parvovirus

    Required vaccinations for cats:

    • Rabies

    • Panleukopenia

    • Rhinotrachetis

    • Calicivirus

    • Chlamydia Psittaci (optional)

    Quarantine periods

    Typical quarantine periods and documentation requirements for dogs and cats are summarised in the following table. Check with MPI (Ministry for Primary Industries) or your pet quarantine company for additional requirements.

    All pets require a minimum of 10 days quarantine except those coming from Australia. Pets must be quarantined at a MPI approved facility. MPI is unable to offer exemptions from this requirement.

    Origin

    Import Permit Required

    Zoo Cert.

    Vet Cert.A

    Vet Cert. B

    Australia

    No

    Yes

    Yes

    Yes

    United Kingdom

    Yes

    Yes

    Yes

    Yes

    Hawaii

    Yes

    Yes

    Yes

    Yes

    USA

    Yes

    Yes

    Yes

    Yes

    South Africa

    Yes

    Yes

    Yes

    Yes

    Specified countries

    Yes

    Yes

    Yes

    Yes

     

  • Language Requirements Open or Close

    The need for excellent English was emphasised by changes to immigration policy in November 2002. The Government raised the minimum English IELTS level for General Skills applicants from 5.0 to 6.5.

    The Government's position is that it's pointless for immigrants to come to New Zealand to be unemployed - and that's what tends to happen if English language skills are lacking.

    In a change to the English Language requirements, the Government is raising the cap on the number of new migrants allowed into the country and has instructed the Immigration service to approve more applications as the labour and skills shortage continues to bite.

    Now the Government is set to lower the pass mark for migrants and will launch a marketing campaign aimed at skilled migrants who speak good English and who it considers will settle into the community.

    For more information, please visit the NZ Government Immigration website http://www.immigration.govt.nz/Migrant.

  • Relocating Tips & Suggestions Open or Close

    Here's a useful list of things to think about doing before relocating to New Zealand.

    Things to do at least 1 month before you move:

    • Review your relocation package if you have one, and determine what expenses will be paid by your company.

    • Start a log of moving expense receipts (some may be tax deductible).

    • Get written estimates from at least 2 moving companies, including their written commitment of pickup and delivery dates. Get references. Check the limits of insurance they offer, and if it covers replacement cost. Purchase additional insurance if necessary.

    • Arrange for storage facility, if you plan to store any contents. Again, check insurance.

    • Arrange transport service for pets or automobiles if needed.

    • Contact your bank and arrange transfer of your accounts; order checks with new address; clean out your safety deposit box.

    • Submit change-of-address forms to the post office; mail postcards to friends & creditors.

    • Give day care centre proper notice of withdrawal.

    • Contact schools and arrange for transfer of student records.

    • Contact your doctors for medical records and possible referrals to new physicians.

    • Ensure that your pet's vaccination records are up to date.

    • Change your insurance policies on property, auto and medical.

    • Organize all important documents in a fire-safe box. Some things you want to include are school records, home purchase/sale papers, will, marriage/divorce papers, pet documents, financial records, stock certificates, social security cards, birth certificates, and passports.

    • Give notice of resignation to any clubs, organizations or volunteer activities you belong to.

    • Cancel newspaper subscriptions.

    • Arrange for hotels, rental cars or temporary housing as needed

     

    Things to do about 2 weeks before you move:

    • Take a ruthless walk-through to determine what you really want to take.

    • Tag the rest of it and hold a garage sale; or call a charity for pick-up.

    • Clean out club, gym and school lockers; pick up all dry cleaning.

    • Arrange for the disconnection or changeover of utilities.

    • If possible, have measurements taken of the rooms in your new residence and use floorplans to determine where everything will go.

    • Begin packing less-used items. Number and label each box, and keep an inventory. For more valuable information.

    • Retrieve and return all borrowed items from neighbors & friends; return library books.

    • Clean out the cupboards & plan remaining meals so you can pack what you don't need, and don't buy any more perishables than you have to.

     

    Things to do 1 week before you move:

    • Make an inventory list of all items going with you personally. Keep valuable and irreplaceable items such as jewelry and heirlooms with you, not movers.

    • Confirm arrangements and dates with moving & storage companies.

    • Confirm arrangements with auto & pet transportation companies.

    • Confirm hotel, rental car or temporary housing accommodations.

    • Clean out and defrost the deep freezer.

    • Disassemble furniture or others items.

    • Be sure to check yard and sheds for all items to pack.

    • Inform all friends & relatives of your forwarding address. If your phone service won't be instantaneous, arrange for a temporary voice mailbox; some long distance providers such as Sprint and MCI offer 1-800 voice mail numbers.

    • Take pictures of furniture or get fabric samples for anything you will want to reference for color or decorating before your goods are delivered to your new home.

    • Set aside a box of cleaning supplies and the vaccuum cleaner.

    • Begin making a "Survival Box" for the move. This should include paper, pens, stamps, envelopes, cellophane & heavy duty tape, scissors, tape measure, paper cups, ziplock bags, paper plates & towels, plastic utensils, facial & toilet tissue, instant coffee or tea, cream/sugar, soap, moist towelettes, aspirin, bandaids, can opener, bottled water, travel alarm, flashlight, small tools kit, trash bags, snacks or drinks, children's games, address book, spare car keys, phone books for the city you are leaving and your destination.

     

    Things to do 1-2 days before you move:

    • Clean and defrost refrigerator and freezer.

    • Purchase traveller's cheques for trip expenses.

    • Reconcile and close bank accounts, unless you will be using another branch of the same bank.

    • Conclude financial matters relating to the sale or lease of your home.

    • Movers or your family should complete packing of all household goods for the move. Make sure are boxes are clearly marked.

    • Drop a note in your new neighbour's mailboxes to let them know that you'll be moving in - especially if the moving truck might block access to the road or common driveway

     

    Moving Day

    • Confirm delivery address, directions and delivery date with the movers.

    • Carefully supervise the move. Make sure boxes are clearly marked and your instructions are understood.

    • Clean the home and check entire grounds before leaving.

    • Check thermostat and make sure temperature is set appropriately. Make sure all windows and doors are closed and locked, and all appliances are turned off. Leave forwarding address, garage door openers and any keys, if agreed to, for the new owners or renters.

    • If your home is going to be vacant when you leave, make sure a relative, neighbor or real estate agent has the keys and how to contact you. Also, notify your insurance agent and police department that the home will be empty.

    Arrival Day

    • Check to make sure all utilities are on and working properly.

    • Let family members or friends know you have arrived safely. Check in with your employer to confirm itineraries.

    • Supervise moving crew on location of furniture and boxes. Begin unpacking necessary basics first - basic kitchen utensils, bath toiletries, etc.

    • Give the kids a job to do - let them start on their rooms. Usually, the kitchen and the kids rooms are the best to set up first, as it helps them feel at home.

    • Go over the Bill of Lading from the moving company very carefully before signing; check for damaged items first, as this is usually binding once signed.

tags >> Information about how to Immigrate to New Zealand.

On Arrival Branding
Get a Quote Contact On Arrival Visit our Facebook page Visit our Facebook page